Review of Nikon COOLPIX S8200 16.1 MP CMOS Digital Camera with 14x Optical Zoom NIKKOR ED Glass Lens and Full HD 1080p Video (Silver)

Nikon COOLPIX S8200 16.1 MP CMOS Digital Camera with 14x Optical Zoom NIKKOR ED Glass Lens and Full HD 1080p Video (Silver)

Nikon COOLPIX S8200 16.1 MP CMOS Digital Camera with 14x Optical Zoom NIKKOR ED Glass Lens and Full HD 1080p Video (Silver) facts, useful information and costumer reviews who already ordered plus best price together with really great discount.

Point-and-shoot cameras are specially created for amateur and holiday photography enthusiasts who want to capture incredible pictures, but avoid want to get into the technical details. With a compact size, easy-to-use user interface and incredible performance, these cameras properly fit the bill. Point-and-shoot cameras are available in both basic and advanced modes. The basic ones are almost completely automated, so all you have to do is just point and take. On the other hand, advanced ones have a few controls such as shutter speed, ISO and aperture that you can simply adjust.

This product made by Nikon become one of the great Point and Shot Camera since a lot of purchaser satisfied after using this product. In addition to its features, the best price also becomes a factor. This is a review about Nikon COOLPIX S8200 16.1 MP CMOS Digital Camera with 14x Optical Zoom NIKKOR ED Glass Lens and Full HD 1080p Video (Silver), a product more liked by peoples and have plenty of beneficial reviews. We will present to you customer reviews, product features, descriptions, and a variety of other interesting things. Happy reading.

Nikon COOLPIX S8200 16.1 MP CMOS Digital Camera with 14x Optical Zoom NIKKOR ED Glass Lens and Full HD 1080p Video (Silver) Details and Reviews

Nikon COOLPIX S8200 16.1 MP CMOS

  • Amazon Sales Rank: #13829 in Camera & Photo
  • Color: Silver
  • Brand: Nikon
  • Model: 26287
  • Dimensions: 2.32″ h x 1.30″ w x 4.09″ l, .47 pounds
  • Display size: 3

Estimated Price: Buy or See Best Price

518 of 529 people found the following review helpful.
5Nikon Coolpix S8200, Great camera with a few design flaws
By Snoopy1
I just received my Nikon Coolpix S8200 so my initial comments are admittedly based on just a couple of days playing with the camera, however I noticed how few comments there were, so I thought prospective buyers of this camera should have some additional feedback on which to base their purchase decision. First of all, the other reviewers are right about the placement of the flash mechanism. This is one of the few times that I have had a Nikon camera where so obvious an error in design was made. I have long fingers and you can learn over time, but it is difficult to hold the camera steady without overlapping the flash. I didn’t however let this feature detract from the other excellent features. The quality of the pictures are exceptional indoors and out. I have a Nikon D7000 and the S8200 camera compares favorably in a lot of ways. The mode dial offers choices not on previous Coolpix cameras. The 14X optical zoom is a major improvement over previous cameras like the P300 and for a compact digital camera, the shutter speed is amazinging fast. I like that this model is slightly thicker and a little heavier than my old S3000. It feels better in my hand and I can hold it easier. I will have no problem traveling with this camera when it is not practical to take my D7000. I also like the design of the multi-selector putting functions like flash control, self-timer, macro and exposure adjustment convenient so I do not have to go into a menu to use these features. This camera is a little pricey, but if you put a premium on quality and flexibility versus the average compact digital camera, I would suggest you buy this camera. I don’t think you will be disappointed.

June 2012 Update: One of the most impressive features of this camera is the quality of indoor shots it takes without a flash. Shots are bright, clear with no artificial light distortions that you see with other non-DSLR cameras. I now almost exclusively take low light shots without the flash unless it is outdoors at night with no additional lighting present. I recently attended an indoor graduation ceremony where flash would have been ineffective at the distance I was from the stage. I was concerned that the shutter speed would be so slow without flash that would result in blurred images. This wasn’t the case. Almost all of the shots were clear and lighting was exceptional.

167 of 178 people found the following review helpful.
4great camera, what up with the flash?
By db
I received my Nikon S8200 a few days ago. It is wonderful; easy to use; fast; and did I say, fast. The CMOS screen is better than my Nikon SLR. Downloading the photos to my Nikon Capture NX2 software on my iMac 24″ screen results in photos that are nearly as stunning as my Nikon SLR.

My only gripe is the flash. Whoever decided to put the pop-up flash where it is either never uses a point-and-shoot camera or has little bitty toddler-sized hands. The flash pops up out of the camera right where your left index finger rests. The first time I used it and the flash was required, the flash never came out fully as my left index finger blocked it. The photo was lost.

Warning for critical photo shoots: if you are hoping to get your child’s first step indoors where the flash will be required, be careful, you may loose the shot. You must practice a new way of holding your camera.

Page 12 of the supplied manual shows an artist’s drawing of the left and right hands properly holding the S8200 camera for flash operation. What Nikon has shown is physically impossible with normal sized hands and fingers on the 4″ wide S8200.

My solution modification: I added a small 3/4″ x 1/8″ felt strip to the top of the flash to give me a tactile-feel reminder of the problem. This reminds me to reposition my fingers and thumbs before using flash photography. Now I position my left index finger on the middle of the top of the camera with the left thumb on the middle of the bottom being sure to not block my view of the rear screen with my left hand. Weird, but it can be done.

Someone at Nikon surely thought that the flash on the S8200 was real cool. No, it is not. Do the felt strip mod and you will remember to reposition from the norm.

112 of 119 people found the following review helpful.
4Like it a lot. Amazed so far.
By LittleReadBooks ‘n’ More
Just got my S8200 tonight and am still battling a bad cold, so I didn’t really have a chance to take photos other than inside my house (primarily of my dogs, bedroom, and small christmas tree.) But I have to say, I’m pretty impressed.

As always, I despise my newest camera and am typically *sure* I’m sending it back for its first 1/2 hour in my hands, until I’ve had time to get to know it and discover its nuances. Same thing happened here, not surprisingly. But now I really love it.

I shoot with Nikon SLRs professionally, but I always carry a little ‘snappy cam’ as I call them, around with me, because you never know what you’ll end up wanting or needing a photo of. I have an ‘old’ (2006) Nikon S7C which is certainly small enough and easily portable, but the quality is really lacking, especially with video – which is the other reason I bought the s8200. Full 1080p video is lovely. Hardly any lens zoom noise or AF noise, which is quite different from the ‘clickity click hummm’ the S7C makes.

I PONDERED long and hard over getting this or the P300. While I love the idea of the P300s fast 1.8 lens, the P300s zoom range is around 24-100mm, whereas this camera’s is 25-300mm, and I really need the zoom more than the fast lens. Not to mention that once you zoom in, that fast lens slows down considerably, anyway. And I don’t plan to do a lot of night shots with any ‘snappy’ camera like this.

There is another major difference between the two, and that is the S8200 is 16.1MP and the P300 is only 12MP. You will see the difference in enlargements, especially any over 8×10.

I did a couple of test shots at the long end of the lens (I turned the defacto crappy digital zoom off – which is a nice ability, by the way, so that means just the optical 300mm) and I am really wowed at how clear and sharp they came out. The VR really works well (another thing the old SC7 does have, but that has been clearly improved.)

As for all the other features, I believe they are the same on both models (the S8200 and the P300.) The only difference lies with P300s ability to shoot in program mode, aperture priority, shutter priority, and manual mode. You know what? I’ve been doing this for a long time now, and I don’t know a lot of pros who would want or need that much control in a ‘snappy’ camera. I can’t speak for all pros, but I know the reason many of us carry these is NOT to duplicate and downsize our SLRs, but for the same reason everyone else carries them: to take snapshots! So if I wanted that much control, I’d just stick with my DSLRs.

Took some video (which look great on the beautiful LCD) but haven’t had a chance to see any of them on a TV yet. I can’t seem to get them converted so I can view them on Apple TV (iTunes keeps crashing during conversion – my netbook’s fault I hope.) I’ll have to convert it on my studio’s desktop PC. The other option is direct plug-in, but I only have 1 HDMI input on my bedroom tv and don’t feel like contorting myself to plug the camera in directly. So I’ll have to wait and upate my review about the quality of the video once I’m well enough.

Things that I am surprised I like:

* the black and white copy (not sure why it’s called ‘copy’ – I will have to RTFM) Update: I did RTFM, and it turns out it’s for making copies of print materials. Despite what it’s intended use is, I liked the way some of the photos I took with is came out (that were not printed materials.)

* the high-contrast monochrome,

* the backlighting mode with the ability to choose 0, 1, 2, or 3 stops of HDR (it does the work of compositing in-camera, and you get one nicely-exposed HDR image.) Would love an HDR button on all my cameras, actually, LOL.

* the flash – this little thing throws out a lot of light. I got excellent coverage on a Xmas tree ornament 10 feet away with the lens at 300mm.

Things I don’t like:

* the cheap plasticky door for the HDMI/USB connection. I prefer rubbery ones. These don’t make me feel like they’ll last a lifetime.

* the lack of a manual. Yeah, can’t believe I’m crabbing about it since I don’t read them much, but apparently, I miss them. Thankfully, I have my PC handy.

* the fact that you cannot push the flash back in once it’s been used. So let’s say the first photo I take needs a flash but all the rest that follow do not. Thanks to Nikon I’ll still have the stupid flash popped up and in my way. The only way to retract the flash is to turn off the camera and then turn the camera back on to start snapping again. Stupid design. I’m sure they’ll fix it in some later model at which point my S8200 will appear on eBay. LOL.

* the fact that it doesn’t come with any – ANY – carrying case. Even the S7C did. (not that I ever used it.)

If they remedied the above shortcomings, and if it had a tilt/swivel LCD for shooting at low/high angles, as well as the ability to shoot RAW for optional post-processing futzing*, it would be the perfect camera, IMO.

*While I said I don’t want to miniaturize my DSLRs in a snappy cam, I do want the option of post-processing any excellent photo that I may grab while snapping. RAW is the best way to do that as the changes you make to the file are non-destructive…as opposed to JPEG.

Features of this product

  • 3-inch LCD display
  • 14x optical Zoom-NIKKOR ED glass lens, 25-350mm (35mm equivalent) captures action that’s both near and far; 16.1 effective megapixel CMOS sensor for fast capture and superior low light shooting
  • ultra-high resolution (921,000-dot) LCD monitor with Clear Color display and anti-reflection coating
  • Full HD (1080p) movie recording with stereo sound and one touch record button, great movies made easy
  • Easy Panorama, Night and Backlight/HDR modes, shoot in new creative ways
  • 16.1 effective megapixel CMOS sensor for fast capture and superior low light shooting
  • 14x optical Zoom-NIKKOR ED glass lens, 25-350mm (35mm equivalent) captures action that’s both near and far
  • 3-inch ultra-high resolution (921,000-dot) LCD monitor with Clear Color display and anti-reflection coating
  • Full HD (1080p) movie recording with stereo sound and one touch record button, great movies made easy
  • Easy Panorama, Night and Backlight/HDR modes, shoot in new creative ways

An area and shoot camera is small enough to fit in a pocket or small bag. It has a fixed lens with mechanical and digital zoom options. Most of the leading digital point and shoot cameras give a generous viewing area on the back, lots of manual and programmed settings. Some cameras allow you to choose your aperture, speed and analogous film settings as well as a whole sponsor of features to control the look of your pictures.

All you should know has been revealed so we are highly confident you won’t find any problem to find out to get the product or not. We provide you with the facts but you are the main one to generate a judgment. If you still have hesitation or there’s any worry about the retail price or other, why don’t you take a look other reviews regarding the similar products? You are able to compare them along with more details you can easily find what exactly you need with all the economical for the money. That’s what smart shopper really is.

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