Discount of TriVision NC-240WF HD 1080P IP WiFi Indoor Home Security Camera System Wireless, Micro SD Card DVR up to 128GB, IR Night Vision, Wide View Angle

TriVision NC-240WF HD 1080P IP WiFi Indoor Home Security Camera System Wireless, Micro SD Card DVR up to 128GB, IR Night Vision, Wide View Angle

TriVision NC-240WF HD 1080P IP WiFi Indoor Home Security Camera System Wireless, Micro SD Card DVR up to 128GB, IR Night Vision, Wide View Angle facts, interesting information and costumer opinions who already ordered plus best price with pretty good discount.

Setting a surveillance DVR in your home is simple since it comes with instructions about how to set it up. Thus, you will be guided step by step about how to set it up and how to use it. These DVRs come in all varieties and all sizes. There are even surveillance DVRs that come in the form of pens and flashlights. Do not be surprised if you discovered for yourself being recorded at a friend’s home. You can even convert your laptop or your personal pc computer as a security system. The USB port of your laptop can be converted into a DVR. How’s that for a surveillance machine and you do not have to buy an entire new system. You just have to get a DVR card that can fit in the slot of your existing laptop. The most common types of card are the PCI card. These cards can accommodate up to 16 channel types and each channel needs one camera. Thus, you select how many cameras you will need for your home.

This product made by Trivision become one of the top recomended Surveillance DVR Kits since a lot of shoppers happy after using this product. In addition to its features, the best price also becomes a factor. Below is a review about TriVision NC-240WF HD 1080P IP WiFi Indoor Home Security Camera System Wireless, Micro SD Card DVR up to 128GB, IR Night Vision, Wide View Angle, a product more liked by peoples and have a much of positive reviews. We will present to you customer reviews, product features, descriptions, and a variety of other interesting things. Happy reading.

TriVision NC-240WF HD 1080P IP WiFi Indoor Home Security Camera System Wireless, Micro SD Card DVR up to 128GB, IR Night Vision, Wide View Angle Details and Reviews

TriVision NC-240WF HD 1080P IP WiFi

  • Size: 4MM 1080P WHITE
  • Color: White
  • Brand: Trivision
  • Model: NC-240WF HD 1080P
  • Dimensions: 3.35″ h x 1.54″ w x 3.35″ l, .66 pounds

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Estimated Price: $169.00 Buy or See Best Price

30 of 31 people found the following review helpful.
5Good 1080P Indoor Camera, Significant Improvements over the TriVision NC-107WF
By Charles Hooper
[[VIDEOID:mo35PBKGVYATYGE]]Update September 21, 2014: If you own this camera, or one of the other TriVision 720P or 1080P cameras, I strongly suggest installing the just released 5.78B (20140916) firmware version. The new firmware version not only adds the ability to adjust the image brightness, contrast, hue, saturation, sharpness, and auto exposure target for the camera through a new Image Setup menu option, but also significantly improves the default color accuracy, contrast, and image sharpness.

Description of the Attached Video:
The video shows several video clips that were triggered by the cameras’ motion capture capabilities (most of the specified motion pre-record video segment was trimmed), demonstrating the camera’s ability to capture motion outdoors in daytime as well as indoors using full color or infrared night vision. The video clips were imported into the Windows Live Movie Maker application where subtitles were added, and the video was output as a 1920×1080 resolution WMV video file (15 frames per second, with a 4400kbps target – roughly the same as the original recording) with minimal video or sound quality loss. However, Amazon will likely further compress the uploaded video, degrading the original quality. The timestamp at the top-left of the video was added automatically by the cameras during recording.

I also uploaded a picture that will hopefully help people determine whether or not this camera will work for license plate recognition purposes. The camera has essentially the same viewing angle as the current TriVision NC-336PW with a 6mm lens – probably about 50-60 degrees. That lens will help improve the camera’s license plate recognition capabilities, while decreasing the viewing angle. The ability to read license plates is partially dependent on lighting conditions, angle of the license plate in respect to the camera, and the distance from the camera. Reading a license plate straight-on at two car lengths is possible during the day time, while off-center recognition at that distance is more difficult.

Last December I bought a couple of the TriVision NC-240WF cameras, which are supposed to be identical to the TriVision NC-240WF cameras, other than the color. Those NC-240WF cameras arrived with firmware version 5.49 (build 20130820), which I immediately upgraded to firmware version 5.56. The TriVision NC-239WF cameras that arrived in late February arrived with firmware version 5.57 preinstalled, so the company appears to be getting cameras on the market with newer camera firmware versions fairly quickly. Firmware version 5.60 was released in mid-January, but I have not tried that firmware version in any of my cameras yet.

I bought the TriVision NC-239WF cameras to replace a couple of the TriVision NC-107WF (or NC-107W) cameras that I bought in 2012. While two of the NC-107WF cameras have been rock solid since purchase, some of the NC-107WF cameras are very unstable, regardless if they are using wireless or wired network connections (at any one time three or four of the older cameras might temporarily disappear from the Multi-Live program, sometimes requiring a power cycle to recover). In contrast, the NC-239WF cameras, much like the NC-240WF and the outdoor NC-336PW cameras, appear to be very stable on both wireless and wired network connections.

I know that people have reported in reviews of the various TriVision cameras that the cameras are difficult to set up for wireless network connections. The wireless network equipment (wireless routers, wireless access points, or other such devices) that is already in place plays a huge role in the success of setting up these cameras on wireless networks. Some wireless routers become very confused when the camera “jumps” from a wired network connection to a wireless network connection – see my review of the TriVision NC-240WF for a couple of ideas to resolve this type of problem. Wireless security using MAC address filtering can also cause headaches for the cameras – from what I understand, there is a bug in the latest Netgear firmware that is related to wireless security using MAC address filtering. Some routers with built-in wireless, such as some Cradlepoint 3G routers, have very weak signals that may require the camera to be placed within 20 feet of the router; high-end wireless access points may support this camera at distances of 200 feet or more. The camera requires a four out of five bar signal to operate correctly, although a three bar signal strength seems to be sufficient to support FTP uploading of video clips.

I had no issues setting up the NC-239WF cameras. The first camera required just under eight and a half minutes to completely set up for production use, with the camera’s software already installed on my computer. In that time I changed the administrator’s password, set a static IP address, configured and tested the wireless connection, configured the stream settings (note that the camera shipped with the primary stream’s H.264/MPEG4 bit rate set to 2048 kbps, so I bumped that value to 4096 kbps to improve recording quality), configured the on-screen display to show the date and time, disabled the infrared LED control (so that the camera could be positioned behind a window), configured the motion detection settings so that the Threshold was at a starting value of about 25% and the Sensitivity was at about 75%, enabled the “Record on Alarm” and “Send Files in Storage to FTP Server” tasks, set the system identity for the camera, verified the time zone setting, and configured the Synology NAS to be used as the camera’s time server. The configuration might seem difficult at first, but the configuration interface is fairly well organized. A typical first time buyer of this camera might need 30 to 60 minutes to completely setup the camera.

Pages 40 and 41 of the “Camera Installation for PC Only” manual that ships with the camera attempts to describe how to record pictures or video when the camera detects motion. The description of those tasks could have been written a little more clearly in the manual. You must buy a microSDHC memory card for the camera – make certain that the power cord is unplugged any time you insert or remove the memory card. Below is a partial list of the configuration settings that I typically specify for the TriVision cameras used in production:
1. Run the Camera Setup program on your computer – that program is installed from the mini-CD that ships with the camera.
2. The Camera Setup program should find your camera. Double-click your camera in the list when it is found by the Camera Setup program.
3. Click the Setting button in the web page that appears on the screen.
4. Near the right side of the web page you should see the word “Task”, click that word.
5. Four options should appear, click “Task Management”
6. If you want the camera to record a picture to the memory card when the camera senses motion, put a checkmark in the box that is between the number 7 and the words “Snapshot to storage on alarm”.
7. If you want the camera to record video to the memory card when the camera senses motion, put a checkmark in the box that is between the number 9 and the words “Record to storage on alarm”.
8. Click the Apply button.
9. You must then configure each item that has a checkmark. For example, if you put a checkmark next to “Record to storage on alarm”, click those words on the page (access the link to the settings).
10. The settings that I like to use here are as follows:
— Record from: Primary stream
— Post-recording time: 15 seconds
— Split duration: 15 seconds
— Record thumbnail: Disable
— Record file name: type a unique name for the camera here
— Suffix of file name: Date time
11. Click the Apply button.
12. Click the Back button.
13. If you put a checkmark next to “Snapshot to storage on alarm”, then configure those settings too.
14. At the right of the web page you should see “Motion Detection”, click that item. This is where you are able to control how sensitive the camera is to motion. By default the camera is likely not sensitive enough.
15. Under the “Window 1” heading, slide the Threshold setting to the left so that it is at 25% (1/4 of the distance from the left).
16. Under the “Window 1” heading, slide the Sensitivity setting to the right so that it is at 75% (3/4 of the distance from the left).
17. Click Apply.
18. Watch the blue bar that is between the Threshold and Sensitivity setting. Any time that blue bar reaches the location of the Threshold indicator, the camera will perform the tasks that you previously selected. If you find that the camera is generating too many false alarms, slide the Threshold bar to the right slightly or the Sensitivity bar to the left, then click Apply. If you find that the camera still is not sensitive enough slide the Threshold bar to the left slightly or the Sensitivity bar to the right. Don’t forget to click Apply.
19. The camera will sometimes be a little slow at reacting to motion detection events, and Windows 7’s “Extra Large Icons” view seems to show a preview image from roughly five seconds into a video clip. The camera can be set to start recording video three, five, or 10 seconds before it detects motion – I find that having the camera record five seconds before motion is detected to be ideal. At the right of the web page, click Camera.
20. Click Stream Setup.
21. Under the Primary stream heading, change Prerecord to “5 seconds”
22. Click Apply.

Unlike the NC-240WF cameras that I bought in December, which shipped with the wrong manuals, the NC-239WF shipped with only two manuals that were recently updated (the Mac specific manual was not included). The mini-CD included with the camera (do not attempt to put this mini-CD into a CD drive that does not have a slide-out tray) also included an updated version of the CameraLive program that now eliminates the need to use the separate Camera Setup utility to configure the camera’s settings. That updated CameraLive program _still_ does not have the flexibility offered by the Multi-Live program that shipped with the TriVision cameras in 2012, which allowed quick views of 4, 9, 16, or 32 cameras simultaneously, with the ability to change the relative position of each camera in the user interface. The NC-239WF is compatible with the Multi-Live program (specify port 80 in the configuration, along with the camera’s IP address and the admin user’s password). The Multi-Live program also shipped with the older Y-Cam cameras, and is downloadable from the Y-Cam website (assuming that you previously bought a Y-Cam camera so that you do not run afoul of copyright laws).

The NC-239WF camera with the 5.57 firmware is ONVIF 2 compliant, as are the NC-240WF and NC-336PW cameras. That means that the camera is compatible with various video recording software and hardware solutions that work with ONVIF 2 compliant cameras. The NC-239WF also supports MPEG4, MJPEG (no audio), H.264, RTSP audio, HTTP M3U8, HTTP ASF, and JPG image (with a consistent filename). The free VideoLAN VLC Media Player and the free Apple QuickTime Player are able to decode and display many of the stream types. While the camera supports video playback of videos recorded to an optional microSDHC memory card, that type of playback is almost certain to be a frustratingly slow experience if the camera typically records a lot of motion triggered video clips. If you only have one or two cameras, power off the camera, take out the memory card, and use a computer with a memory card reader to play back the video clips. If you have more than one or two cameras, I highly recommend investing in a Synology NAS and a memory card for the camera, and then instruct the cameras to send their video clips to the Synology NAS using FTP.

Positives of the camera:
* With the 5.57 firmware installed, the camera’s time seems to stay in sync with a local NTP server (feature enabled on a Synology NAS). Prior to the 5.56 firmware, the other TriVision cameras lost roughly 30 seconds per week even when set to synchronize with a local NTP server. The newer firmware also offers to automatically turn on and off daylight savings time, which was previously a manual adjustment (this fix causes problems for the Multi-Live program, which displays an incorrect date and time in the top-right corner of the video stream).

* Compatible with Internet Explorer that ships with Windows 8.1 when camera firmware version 5.57 is installed (this firmware version was preinstalled on my camera).

* Compatible with Synology Surveillance Station’s (version 6.0-2719) ONVIF camera protocol and a variety of other NVR solutions when camera firmware version 5.56 is installed.

* The manuals are reasonably well written, although a couple of the sentences in the manual are written in very shaky English. The specifications in the manual are targeted for the 640×480 resolution cameras, rather than the 1920×1080 resolution cameras.

* Built in motion detection simply works. The camera supports up to four motion detection rectangular regions, each with adjustable sensitivity. This is a pixel change based motion detection feature, which is able to identify objects more than 200 feet from the camera just as easily as it is able to identify falling snow that is just a few feet from the camera. Unlike the external TriVision cameras, there is no provision for adding a PIR unit to the camera to reduce the number of false positive motion detection events.

* Works with the Multi-Live software that shipped with the older TriVision cameras, but this software does not ship with this camera (the Multi-Live program may not be fully compatible with Windows 8.1 – on one Windows 8.1 computer, one camera at random displayed a distorted picture). Multi-Live provides a quick simultaneous view of up to 36 cameras. Multi-Live shrinks the NC-240WF camera’s native 16:9 aspect ratio to a 4:3 aspect ratio (or variable aspect ratio) without cropping the edges of the image.

* Works with the IP Cam Viewer (Basic) app on Android (Motorola Xoom) tablets to allow simultaneous viewing of multiple security cameras, much like the Windows based Multi-Live program – just without audio. The cameras also work with the manufacturer’s recommended AnyScene app, as tested on a Motorola Xoom Android tablet. The AnyScene app, like the supplied Camera Live software, is able to remotely view a camera’s live video stream, even when the camera is on a different network (no manual or automatic configuration of the router is required to use this functionality, and the feature continues to work even if the camera’s IP address changes).

* The NC Setup utility, which also ships with the older cameras, works well with the new cameras to quickly locate and help configure cameras that are still using DHCP assigned IP addresses (I suggest changing all cameras to static IP addresses as soon as possible – the older TriVision NC-107WF cameras were unstable when using DHCP assigned IP addresses).

* Records video to a user installed memory card (I installed a SanDisk Ultra 32 GB MicroSDHC C10/UHS1 memory card) or a Windows compatible NAS (I have not yet had any success using Windows 7 Pro/Ultimate as a NAS for the camera) in Apple QuickTime format, just as do all of the other TriVision cameras that I have used.

* Optional camera tasks are available to schedule periodic captures of still frame JPG images and send those pictures to email servers (the feature is not compatible with all email servers, the manual recommends Google’s Gmail, which I successfully tested with an NC-316W and NC-336PW camera), FTP servers, HTTP web servers (not tested), and to storage (either the configured memory card or a NAS). Additional optional tasks allow sending one or more still frame JPG images to the same destinations when motion is detected. Recording video to an FTP server requires the configuration of two tasks in the camera setup, “Record to storage on alarm” and “Send files in storage to FTP server”.

* Core functionality of the camera allows the camera to minimize wireless (or wired when using the integrated 100mbps RJ45 connection) network traffic caused by the camera – the camera does not need to continuously broadcast its video feed to a digital video recorder device for the video with motion to be captured (although the camera can continuously broadcast its video stream with almost no configuration). The camera is capable of asynchronously uploading video stored on the memory card (or a configured NAS) to an FTP server (I use a Synology NAS with the FTP service enabled). With the two task configuration, the camera will continue to record motion triggered video to the internal memory card if the FTP server is unavailable. Video may be uploaded to a NAS or Windows share using a single configured task in the camera configuration; however, the camera will not revert back to using an installed memory card when the NAS or Windows share is unavailable.

* The built-in microphone’s sound quality (the sound test is at the end of the attached video) seems to be reasonably good with some white noise filtering, and there was no noticeable electronic noise caused by the camera’s wireless hardware as has been reported with Y-Cam’s Cube camera line.

* The camera supports streaming playback of video stored on the optional memory card, allowing quick views of the video. The older TriVision cameras required a much more time consuming process to view video stored on the camera’s memory card, a process which downloaded the entire video clip before playback could begin. The recorded video will play back using either the QuickTime control or the TriVision ActiveX control (it seems that the camera tries to force the use of the QuickTime control even when using Internet Explorer to view the videos).

* Video uploaded to an FTP server or NAS is stored in a single folder (directory) on the server, which allows quick review of the video uploaded by multiple cameras throughout the day. Y-Cam’s 1080P outdoor bullet camera, in contrast, uploads video into a nested directory storage structure of Year Month Day Hour Minute – that nested directory structure makes it impossible to quickly review video uploaded by one or more cameras; I do not know if the same inconvenient storage structure is used with Y-Cam’s Cube camera line.

* Connects wirelessly to 802.11b/g/n WEP and WPA2 encrypted networks even when the network SSID is not being broadcast (tested with a Cisco Linksys E2000 router acting as access point, and an EnGenius ENH202 wireless access point).

* Offers two-level user access security to the camera for administrators and regular users. The current release of the Camera Live software only uses the admin user’s login. I understand that a future release of the Camera Live software will work for either a privileged account (admin) or a regular user account, and Camera Live will be able to configure the camera, thus eliminating the need to use the Camera Setup utility.

* The motion-triggered recorded video duration is configurable from 5 to 86,400 seconds, and that recorded video may be automatically broken up into multiple video clips ranging from 10 seconds to 1,200 seconds. A 15 second “Post-recording time” and 15 second “Split duration” combined with a 5 second pre-record (configurable in the Stream setup to record 0, 3, 5, or 10 seconds before the motion detection event) is ideal for video clips that are previewed with Windows 7’s Windows Explorer’s “Extra Large Icons” view, allowing the motion triggering event to appear in the Windows generated thumbnail.

* The mounting stand is sturdy and reasonably easy to repoint using a quarter or half dollar coin.

* The power supply included with the camera has a very long cord (roughly eight to ten feet, or possibly 3 meters) which helps with installation. The power supply’s 12 volt connector plugs directly into the back of the camera, as does the included network cable.

* Automatic light intensity adjustment during the daytime, automatically switching to black and white night vision with infrared lighting when necessary. It is possible to disable the camera’s infrared lights (necessary when the camera is pointed through a window) and have the camera be sensitive to or immune from stand-alone infrared lights that are on the other side of the window.

Negatives:
* The company still does not have a functional website; the user manual mentions the ability to download firmware updates from the company’s website. Based on what has been posted on Amazon by a TriVision tech support person, the website is supposed to be available by the end of March 2014.

* The camera’s time resets to the year 1969 when power is lost, and is restored to the correct time and date once a network time source is reachable. A local Synology NAS can be configured as the network time source for the camera so that the correct time appears on the camera in the event that a power outage knocks out the Internet connection.

* The 1080P video quality is not comparable with that produced by a $30,000 network TV camera. While I did not find that the camera ever paused for a second while recording, there is still a bit of a “flip-frame” feel to the video. As an economical security camera, the generated day time video is fine. The night time infra-red illuminated video is also fine in enclosed spaces at a distance of 10 to 25 feet. With the camera pointed into an empty area at night with nothing within roughly 30 feet of the camera, the video becomes very grainy, similar to the video recorded by the outdoor NC-336PW.

On Windows 7 the recorded video clips will show in the Extra Large Icons view with a black frame around the edges – that black frame blocks a portion of the video preview. That black frame can be disabled by importing the following information into the Windows registry, and then rebooting the computer (save the text shown between the ——— markers in a text file with a .reg extension and then double-click the file to import the settings).
———
Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOTSystemFileAssociationsvideo]
“ThumbnailCutoff”=dword:00000001
“Treatment”=dword:00000000
———

As I mentioned above, I recommend using the camera with a Synology NAS, instructing the camera to send its video clips to the NAS using FTP, if you intend to buy two or more cameras. Below is information that I previously posted on Amazon about selecting a Synology NAS:
The least expensive Synology NAS option appears to be a DS112j (roughly $160) plus the cost of a hard drive. I have used this NAS with a Western Digital Red 2TB hard drive as an FTP destination for a couple of TriVision cameras. You can save about $30 by going with a 1TB drive, but you will be kicking yourself for going cheap once you start adding camera #3 and #4 (in a pinch, if you have an old hard drive sitting around, you might be able to use it short-term in the NAS so that you do not need to immediately buy a hard drive):
DS112j: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B007KWLXRK/
WD Red 2TB: http://www.amazon.com/WD-Red-NAS-Hard-Drive

In general with the Synology devices, models with a “j”, “se”, “air”, or “slim” suffix are the low cost versions with slow CPUs, no internal fan (so they probably need to be in an air conditioned environment in summer time), have the lowest electricity operating cost, and tend to have the lower limits regarding the number of “active” connections. The 64 “Max Concurrent CIFS/AFP/FTP Connections” sounds like a very high number when you only have four cameras, but if one or two cameras have a weak wireless signal, the Synology will remember connections (and count those connections) to the camera long after the cameras has forgotten about the connections. Each computer that is set up to access the location on the Synology where the videos are stored will count as an additional connection, even if that computer is not actively looking at the videos. If you set up a second location for computer backups on the Synology, that potentially further decreases the available connections by 1 to 3 per computer.

The Synology models without a suffix (DS114, DS214, DS414, etc.) typically have faster CPUs than the models with the “j” suffix, and typically support a higher number of “Max Concurrent CIFS/AFP/FTP Connections”, meaning that you are less likely to need to reboot a NAS because the cameras suddenly stopped sending videos to the NAS (the videos will be stored on the memory cards that you installed until the Synology is accessible again). The faster CPU means that the NAS is able to read from and write to the hard drive(s) faster, and also handle other tasks in the background (for instance, I have some of my Synology units monitoring computers, servers, printers, cameras, and other devices, with the Synology sending an email to me if a device stops responding). There are a lot of free add-on software packages for the Synology NAS units, and if any of those free add-on packages appear to be interesting, you probably should pick a NAS with a fast CPU. The Synology models in this group may have “passive” cooling, meaning that there is no internal fan. Some of the units have built-in USB3 ports (don’t bother trying to add an external hard drive to a NAS with only USB2 ports, it will be very slow), which will allow you to attach an external Western Digital (or other brand) hard drive with a USB3 port for additional storage space.

The Synology models with a “+” indicator have faster CPUs, so they are able to more easily handle the free add-on packages in addition to receiving videos from your cameras via FTP; the two drive unit uses a faster version of the Marvell Armada that is used on the less expensive Synology NAS units. The four drive and larger units use variants of the Intel CPU architecture, which allows the NAS access to additional features such as the Plex Media Server ( http://blog.synology.com/blog/?p=1012 ) and the Oracle Instant Client (which allows requesting information from an Oracle database). The “+” models have “active” cooling, meaning that they have one or more internal fans, allowing them to more easily survive in environments without air conditioning.

The number that immediately follows the “DS” in the name usually describes the (maximum) number of hard drives that the unit supports. A DS112j supports one hard drive, a DS214+ supports two hard drives, a DS412+ supports four hard drives, a DS1813+ supports eight internal drives and up to 10 additional drives in optional expansion units. The number at the end of the model name refers to the model year of the release – a new unit released in September might carry the following year’s date in the model name. Usually, the higher that year indicator, the faster the NAS is, and the more (RAM) memory is installed. The DS1812+ and the DS412+ both have the same CPU and the amount of (RAM) memory installed. The DS1813+ carries essentially the same CPU with twice as much memory, and uses a 64 bit operating system rather than a 32 bit operating system, allowing the memory to be expanded to 4GB rather than 3GB.

Most of the throughput statistics (network transfer speeds) stated on the manufacturer’s website assume that you have a gigabit network. A gigabit network port is capable of transferring up to roughly 112MB to 115MB per second. Any claim on Synology’s website, such as the 208MB per second read speed of the DS214+ is plain and simple a distortion of the truth. Achieving that speed requires a compatible network switch that is properly configured, and it requires that two or more client computers are simultaneously trying to read information from the NAS – a single computer will never see 208MB per second from the NAS.

A Synology NAS should work fine with fewer than the maximum number of hard drives installed. If you have only non-essential information on the NAS (video clips from the cameras probably fall in this category), then installing a single hard drive into the NAS is probably fine. If you plan to store information on the NAS that is important, then you should install multiples of two identical drives (2, 4, 6, 8) into the NAS and tell the NAS to set up a RAID 1 array (in the case of two hard drives) or a RAID 10 array (in the case of more than two hard drives). This configuration creates an internal “backup” of all information stored in the NAS, making it less likely to lose everything if one of the hard drives in the NAS stops working correctly. This also means that you will lose half of the total capacity of the installed hard drives. For example, if you install four 3TB hard drives, you will only receive a “nominal” 6TB of actual disk space.

If you plan to stop at four cameras and only intend to use the NAS with the cameras, a DS112j will be sufficient. My DS112j was showing roughly 50% CPU utilization with two of the four cameras (NC-326PW 720P) continuously sending video clips via FTP, while I was connected to the NAS on a computer watching the video clips arrive. With the memory card arrangement in the cameras, if the NAS becomes a little slow the cameras do not care too much – they will continue to write new video clips to the memory card and continue to simultaneously send older video clips to the FTP server as fast as the FTP server and network will permit. I initially planned to have only eight 640×480 cameras sending video to my Synology DS212+ NAS. That was nearly two years ago. I now have significantly more cameras connected to the DS212+ (perhaps twice as many), and most of those are now high definition 1080P cameras. That DS212+ has no trouble keeping up with a typical day’s set of videos from the cameras. However, at night time when it is snowing, and every external camera is sending a continuous flood of video clips to the DS212+, the NAS’ CPU approaches 100%, and it becomes nearly impossible for my Windows 7 computer to generate the thumbnail previews of the video clips on the NAS (so that I can determine which video clips should be viewed) because the NAS is so slow to respond. When this happens, I generally wait until the next day to review the video clips.

47 of 52 people found the following review helpful.
5Almost Perfect Indoor 1080P Security Camera
By Charles Hooper
[[VIDEOID:mo1L0264KM0NP3U]]Update September 21, 2014: If you own this camera, or one of the other TriVision 720P or 1080P cameras, I strongly suggest installing the just released 5.78B (20140916) firmware version. The new firmware version not only adds the ability to adjust the image brightness, contrast, hue, saturation, sharpness, and auto exposure target for the camera through a new Image Setup menu option, but also significantly improves the default color accuracy, contrast, and image sharpness.

Description of the Attached Video:
The video shows several video clips that were triggered by the cameras’ motion capture capabilities (most of the specified motion pre-record video segment was trimmed), demonstrating the camera’s ability to capture motion outdoors in daytime as well as indoors using full color or infrared night vision. The video clips were imported into the Windows Live Movie Maker application where subtitles were added, and the video was output as a 1920×1080 resolution WMV video file (15 frames per second, with a 4400kbps target – roughly the same as the original recording) with minimal video or sound quality loss. The timestamp at the top-left of the video was added automatically by the cameras during recording.

I have purchased several of the TriVision camera models since April 2012, including the indoor NC-107W and NC-107WF, and the outdoor NC-336PW. The 640×480 resolution NC-107W and NC-107WF indoor cameras impressed me at first, although I encountered quite a number of unexpected lockups with some of those cameras, while others worked nearly flawlessly. The NC-336PW cameras have a different, easier to use setup interface than what was provided with the older TriVision cameras, and the NC-336PW cameras also appear to be much more stable. This camera, the NC-240WF (and its sister, the NC-239WF), appears to pack the features/capabilities of the NC-336PW into the same size package as the NC-107WF (roughly 3.25 inches square and 1.5 inches deep).

I was initially quite disappointed with the two NC-240WF cameras that I bought. I already had the Camera Setup program that ships with the camera installed on my computer, because it is the same software that shipped with the first TriVision cameras that I bought in April 2012. Once I took the camera boxes out of the shipping box (the camera boxes were in good shape, even though the shipping box lacked any packaging material to keep the two camera boxes from shifting), I set a stop watch. The first camera required 14 minutes to completely set up, including the time to unwrap the box, unwrap a memory card, boot a computer, attach the camera to its stand, and walk up and down a flight of stairs. In that 14 minutes I configured everything needed to use the camera in production, including changing the password, specifying a static IP address, configuring the stream settings, tweaking the motion detection settings, configuring and testing the wireless connection, and setting up the camera for FTP upload of videos. Not quite three simple steps, but not too bad for what I wanted to do with the camera.

The time required to setup the camera was not the disappointment. After completing the setup, I immediately took one of the cameras to a location that was approximately 387 feet (118 meters) from a high powered (800mW) wireless access point, along with a laptop computer. At that distance the camera’s web page showed a 3 out of 5 bar wireless signal strength, while the laptop showed a 4 out of 5 bar signal strength. At that distance the camera simply could not reliably stream video, although the laptop would occasionally pick up and display a couple of frames of video. I brought the camera back inside, allowed it roughly 30 minutes to acclimate to the temperature change, and plugged it into the power outlet roughly 50 feet from the high powered wireless access point. The camera showed a 5 out of 5 bar wireless signal strength, yet the live video stream from the camera’s web page stopped for a couple of minutes without explanation. I then performed a couple of quick color and night vision tests. The camera seemed to have problems with color video recording, recording in black and white even when an overhead light was turned on. I then forced the camera to record in color, and found that the recorded picture was very poor, with a large number of horizontal lines of noise in the picture. I now believe that the video recording problems were caused by two issues: the camera’s light sensor was pointed at another room that was still quite dark, and the camera did not properly acclimate to the roughly 50F to 60F temperature change when brought indoors.

Later testing revealed that the camera is quite good, almost ideal. The color recording in the daytime shows accurate color reproduction with smooth motion. The nighttime infrared at a close range of 15 to 20 feet (4.5M to 6M) is impressive, with the camera showing a gray scale video image rather than a dithered purely black and white image as the NC-336PW cameras seem to produce. At a distance of roughly 45 feet (14 meters) objects were visible, but mostly as general shapes, lacking any definition. The infrared lights fully cover the camera’s nighttime image. The viewable angle of the camera seems to be roughly the same as that of the NC-336PW camera with the 6mm lens. The camera shipped with firmware version 5.49 (build 20130820), which I upgraded to version 5.56 (build 20131126) after obtaining the newer firmware version from TriVision support.

Positives:
* With the 5.56 firmware installed, the camera’s time seems to stay in sync with a local NTP server (feature enabled on a Synology NAS). The other TriVision cameras (at least before the 5.56 firmware is installed) seem to lose roughly 30 seconds per week even when set to synchronize with a local NTP server. The newer firmware also offers to automatically turn on and off daylight savings time, which was previously a manual adjustment (this fix causes problems for the Multi-Live program, which displays an incorrect date and time in the top-right corner of the video stream).

* Compatible with Internet Explorer that ships with Windows 8.1 when camera firmware version 5.56 is installed (the 5.49 preinstalled firmware is only partially compatible).

* Compatible with Synology Surveillance Station’s (version 6.0-2719) ONVIF camera protocol and a variety of other NVR solutions when camera firmware version 5.56 is installed.

* The manuals are reasonably well written, although a couple of the sentences in the manual are written in very shaky English. The specifications in the manual are targeted for the 640×480 resolution cameras, rather than the 1920×1080 resolution cameras. The PC Installation Guide manual, as well as the Mac installation guide that shipped with the cameras are written for the NC-107WF and NC-306W cameras, which have a different web interface (Alarm and Alarm Server shown in the screen captures do not exist in the camera configuration, while the Task option does not appear in the documentation).

* Built in motion detection simply works. The camera supports up to four motion detection rectangular regions, each with adjustable sensitivity. This is a pixel change based motion detection feature, which is able to identify objects more than 200 feet from the camera just as easily as it is able to identify falling snow that is just a few feet from the camera. Unlike the external TriVision cameras, there is no provision for adding a PIR unit to the camera to reduce the number of false positive motion detection events.

* Works with the Multi-Live software that shipped with the older TriVision cameras, but this software does not ship with this camera (the Multi-Live program may not be fully compatible with Windows 8.1 – on one Windows 8.1 computer, one camera at random displayed a distorted picture). Multi-Live provides a quick simultaneous view of up to 36 cameras. Multi-Live shrinks the NC-240WF camera’s native 16:9 aspect ratio to a 4:3 aspect ratio (or variable aspect ratio) without cropping the edges of the image. The supplied Camera Live software is able to find the NC-240WF camera, as well as the other 2013 released TriVision cameras that I own (NC-336PW and NC-326PW), but could not connect to any of the older TriVision cameras.

* Works with the IP Cam Viewer (Basic) app on Android (Motorola Xoom) tablets to allow simultaneous viewing of multiple security cameras, much like the Windows based Multi-Live program – just without audio. The cameras also work with the manufacturer’s recommended AnyScene app, as tested on a Motorola Xoom Android tablet. The AnyScene app, like the supplied Camera Live software, is able to remotely view a camera’s live video stream, even when the camera is on a different network (no manual or automatic configuration of the router is required to use this functionality, and the feature continues to work even if the camera’s IP address changes).

* The NC Setup utility, which also ships with the older cameras, works well with the new cameras to quickly locate and help configure cameras that are still using DHCP assigned IP addresses (I suggest changing all cameras to static IP addresses as soon as possible – the older TriVision NC-107WF cameras were unstable when using DHCP assigned IP addresses).

* Records video to a user installed memory card (I installed a SanDisk Ultra 32 GB MicroSDHC C10/UHS1 memory card) or a Windows compatible NAS in Apple QuickTime format, just as do all of the other TriVision cameras that I have used.

* Optional camera tasks are available to schedule periodic captures of still frame JPG images and send those pictures to email servers (the feature is not compatible with all email servers, the manual recommends Google’s Gmail, which I successfully tested with an NC-316W and NC-336PW camera), FTP servers, HTTP web servers (not tested), and to storage (either the configured memory card or a NAS). Additional optional tasks allow sending one or more still frame JPG images to the same destinations when motion is detected. Recording video to an FTP server requires the configuration of two tasks in the camera setup, “Record to storage on alarm” and “Send files in storage to FTP server”.

* Core functionality of the camera allows the camera to minimize wireless (or wired when using the integrated 100mbps RJ45 connection) network traffic caused by the camera – the camera does not need to continuously broadcast its video feed to a digital video recorder device for the video with motion to be captured (although the camera can continuously broadcast its video stream with almost no configuration). The camera is capable of asynchronously uploading video stored on the memory card (or a configured NAS) to an FTP server (I use a Synology NAS with the FTP service enabled). With the two task configuration, the camera will continue to record motion triggered video to the internal memory card if the FTP server is unavailable. Video may be uploaded to a NAS or Windows share using a single configured task in the camera configuration; however, the camera will not revert back to using an installed memory card when the NAS or Windows share is unavailable.

* I was not terribly impressed with the built-in microphone’s sound quality when I first started testing the camera – the recorded sound seemed to be muffled, and with the 5.56 firmware installed there is no longer a microphone volume control in the camera setup. So, I tried a test with an FM radio located 40 feet (12 meters) from the camera. I turned up the radio volume so that it was just loud enough to be heard comfortably when standing next to the radio, and placed a 0.25 inch thick sheet of plywood directly in front of the camera, blocking the bottom half of the camera’s view. The results of that test are included at the end of the attached video. The camera’s microphone seemed to filter out some of the static that was present in the radio’s FM playback, and there was no noticeable electronic noise caused by the camera’s wireless hardware as has been reported with Y-Cam’s Cube camera line.

* Supports multiple video stream types including MPEG4, MJPEG (no audio), H.264, RTSP audio, HTTP M3U8, HTTP ASF, and JPG image (with a consistent filename). The free VideoLAN VLC Media Player and the free Apple QuickTime Player are able to decode and display many of the stream types.

* The camera supports streaming playback of video stored on the optional memory card, allowing quick views of the video. The older TriVision cameras required a much more time consuming process to view video stored on the camera’s memory card, a process which downloaded the entire video clip before playback could begin. The recorded video will play back using either the QuickTime control or the TriVision ActiveX control (it seems that the camera tries to force the use of the QuickTime control even when using Internet Explorer to view the videos).

* Video uploaded to an FTP server or NAS is stored in a single folder (directory) on the server, which allows quick review of the video uploaded by multiple cameras throughout the day. Y-Cam’s 1080P outdoor bullet camera, in contrast, uploads video into a nested directory storage structure of Year Month Day Hour Minute – that nested directory structure makes it impossible to quickly review video uploaded by one or more cameras; I do not know if the same inconvenient storage structure is used with Y-Cam’s Cube camera line.

* Connects wirelessly to 802.11b/g/n WEP and WPA2 encrypted networks even when the network SSID is not being broadcast (tested with a Cisco Linksys E2000 router acting as access point, and an EnGenius ENH202 wireless access point).

* Offers two-level user access security to the camera for administrators and regular users. The current release of the Camera Live software only uses the admin user’s login. I understand that a future release of the Camera Live software will work for either a privileged account (admin) or a regular user account, and Camera Live will be able to configure the camera, thus eliminating the need to use the Camera Setup utility.

* The motion-triggered recorded video duration is configurable from 5 to 86,400 seconds, and that recorded video may be automatically broken up into multiple video clips ranging from 10 seconds to 1,200 seconds. A 15 second “Post-recording time” and 15 second “Split duration” combined with a 5 second pre-record (configurable in the Stream setup to record 0, 3, 5, or 10 seconds before the motion detection event) is ideal for video clips that are previewed with Windows 7’s Windows Explorer’s “Extra Large Icons” view, allowing the motion triggering event to appear in the Windows generated thumbnail.

* The mounting stand is sturdy and reasonably easy to repoint using a quarter or half dollar coin.

* The power supply included with the camera has a very long cord (roughly eight to ten feet, or possibly 3 meters) which helps with installation. The power supply’s 12 volt connector plugs directly into the back of the camera, as does the included network cable.

* Automatic light intensity adjustment during the daytime, automatically switching to black and white night vision with infrared lighting when necessary. It is possible to disable the camera’s infrared lights (necessary when the camera is pointed through a window) and have the camera be sensitive to or immune from stand-alone infrared lights that are on the other side of the window.


Negatives:
* Even with the 5.56 firmware installed, the camera seems to prefer lower quality wireless signals over higher quality signals (on a different wireless channel) if both of the wireless networks have the same SSID. One of the cameras consistently dropped a 5 out of 5 bar signal with an access point located 50 feet away to connect to another access point that is located roughly 180 feet away, in the process losing its ability to stream a live video feed. The second camera consistently dropped a 5 out of 5 bar signal with a high powered (800mW) access point located 20 feet away to join a consumer grade wireless router (Linksys E2000) located 130 feet away; that camera maintained a 4 out of 5 bar signal with the Linksys Router, and was still able to live stream video at 15 frames per second.

* The camera seems to require at least a 4 out of 5 bar signal strength to work reliably, so there is not much point in the camera showing s signal strength below 4 bars.

* I noticed one unexpected wireless dropout at a distance of roughly 50 feet from a high powered wireless access point. The camera showed a 5 out of 5 bar signal, was successfully streaming video for several minutes, and then suddenly fell off the network for a minute or two.

* The frame rate specified in the camera’s setup interface does not match the actual recorded frame rate. Specifying 18 frames per second results in video recorded at 15 frames per second, specifying 15 frames per second results in video recorded at 12 frames per second, and specifying 10 frames per second results in video recorded at 8 frames per second. My theory is that this discrepancy is caused by the 60Hz “Light frequency” setting that is standard in the U.S., while the 50Hz “Light frequency” setting is common in other parts of the world; the actual frame rate is 50/60 of the specified frame rate.

* The camera tends to reset its clock back to 1969 after a power outage, however that time will be adjusted correctly once the NTP server is reachable (note the time and date displayed at the start of the attached video is incorrect).

* There are occasional, less than one second skips in the video recorded to the camera’s optional memory card.

* The wrong printed manuals shipped with the cameras. The supplied manuals show screen captures that are specific to the web interface found on the NC-107W/WF and NC-306P cameras, and do not describe the “Task” options found in the 2013 released TriVision cameras (NC-240WF, NC-316W/P, NC-326PW/W, and NC-336PW/W). The correct manuals are provided in electronic form (PDF) on the mini-CD that is included with the cameras.

* The specified “H.264/MPEG4 bitrate” setting is apparently only a rough throughput guideline. With the camera set to its maximum 4096kbps bit rate, the camera’s live web view shows the throughput occasionally drifting well above 5Mb/s (5120kbps) – I do not have a problem with that occasional speed drifting if the drifting results in fewer video skips.

* There is a slight bowing distortion of the video near the top and bottom centers of the recorded video, as well as near the left and right centers of the recorded video.

ANSWERS TO A COUPLE OF POTENTIAL QUESTIONS:
Some people may experience problems when trying to switch the camera from a wired connection to a wireless connection. The explanation of the problem is a little technical, so you may want to skip reading the last paragraph. The simple solution is usually, after unplugging the network cable from the camera, to reboot (unplug the power for 30 seconds, and then plug back in) the device into which the network cable was connected (do not reboot the camera – it is not the problem in this case). The camera may then receive a different IP address, so you may need to use the Camera Setup program to find the camera on the network again.

In simple terms, what happens is the device into which the camera was connected remembers “any time someone wants to access the camera, send the communication to Ethernet port nnn”. When you unplug the Ethernet cable, the camera will automatically switch to using its wireless network adapter, which has the same fingerprint (MAC address) as the camera’s Ethernet port adapter so that the camera’s IP address does not change when you unplug the Ethernet cable. What happens is that the router or switch (or whatever you plugged the camera into) continues to insist that the device with the camera’s MAC address is found on Ethernet port nnn, even though the camera announces to the network that the camera’s MAC address is connected to the wireless “port”. The router or switch (or whatever you plugged the camera into) is effectively blocking the communication between your computer and the camera.

The problem boils down to an issue with the router or switch not correctly updating its MAC address routing table when the camera’s MAC address jumps from a wired connection to a wireless connection. I have not yet experienced this problem with the NC-240WF cameras, but did encounter the same problem with Y-Cam’s Bullet 1080P cameras, and the older TriVision NC-107WF cameras (and probably the NC-306W also). I am guessing that the reason that I did not encounter the problem with the NC-240WF cameras is either because I updated the firmware in my Cisco (Linksys) routers, or because I had multiple Cisco (Linksys) routers (that configuration effectively allows the first router to see that the camera’s MAC address is found on the Ethernet port that connects the two routers when the camera jumps to the other router’s wireless connection). Ideally, the camera should use a different MAC address for the wireless and wired connections so as not to confuse routers and switches – the problem is that DHCP servers on the network (which hand out IP addresses) use the MAC address to decide if a device should receive the same IP address (I remember you, here is your old IP address again), or a different IP address; the camera would likely have 2 different IP addresses depending on if the camera was using the wireless or wired connection.

Configuring the Camera to Work with a Synology NAS’ Windows Compatible Share:
Create a new “Shared Folder” on the Synology NAS. Next, on the NAS create a new user account and permitted that user account read/write access to the new “Shared Folder”. Switch the camera’s Storage – Storage Setup from using its internal memory card to the new “Shared Folder” on a Synology NAS. Use the following settings in the camera’s Storage Setup:
– Store to: NAS
– NAS remote path: //192.168.168.50 /ipcam_files (actual IP address of the Synology was provided prefixed with //, along with the actual name of the “Shared Folder” – do not add a space after the IP address).
– Authorization: Yes
– User name: (the new user created on the Synology)
– Password: (the password for the new user created on the Synology)
– Store directory: IPCAMERA (the default)

Finally, make certain that the “Send files in storage to FTP server” task is disabled – leaving that option enabled would cause the camera to remove the videos which were uploaded to the NAS when sending those videos to the configured FTP server

Configuring the Camera to Work with a Synology with the FTP Server Option Enabled:
On the Synology NAS, create a “Shared Folder” named something like “video” (without the quotes). Next, make certain that the FTP server is enabled on the Synology, and on the Synology create a username that will be used by the camera. You will be prompted for the Shared Folder permissions for the username – make certain that you permit the user to have read and write access to the “video” share (you might also need to allow that username to connect by FTP). In the “Send Files in Storage to FTP Server” task in the camera setup, you will see a text box with the title “Remote path:”. In the box enter “/video” (without the quotes – this is the shared folder that was created on the Synology, with a / in front) and fill in the rest of the information, such as the IP address of the Synology, the username, and password.

Configuring the Camera to Use a Windows XP Home Computer as a NAS:
If your computer is running Windows XP Home, it is fairly easy to set up the computer to allow the camera to record to the computer (the other Home versions of Windows are probably similar, however Windows User Access Control may require you to create the “Camera” folder in your “Documents” folder. You need to make certain that the Windows (or other brand) firewall is disabled on the computer, set up a shared folder, and then set up the camera to use that shared folder. It sounds a little complicated, but is pretty easy with the following steps:
1. Create a new folder on the C: drive, name the folder “Camera” (without the quotes)
2. Right-click the Camera folder and select “Sharing and Security…”
3. Place a check in the box “Share this folder on the network”
4. Place a check in the box “Allow network users to change my files”
5. Click OK – the computer now has a shared folder named “Camera”
6. Make certain that the Windows firewall is disabled (note that there are potential security risks with doing this operation if the computer is directly connected to the Internet):
–6a. From the Start menu, click Run…
–6b. Type “services.msc” (without the quotes) and then press the Enter key
–6c. Scroll down to “Windows Firewall/Internet Connection Sharing (ICS)”
–6d. If the Status column shows “Started”, double-click the line, change the “Startup type” to Disabled, click Stop, then click OK
–6e. Close the Services window
7. Find the IP address of the computer:
–7a. From the Start menu, click Run…
–7b. Type “cmd” (without the quotes) and press the Enter key
–7c. Type “ipconfig” (without the quotes) and press the Enter key. On a sheet of paper record the IP Address value, for instance 192.185.1.100
–7d. Type “exit” (without the quotes) and press the Enter key.
8. Using Internet Explorer (or open the configuration page using the Camera Setup program) open the web configuration page for the camera
9. Click Storage, then Storage Setup
10. Set up the camera to store videos to the computer:
–10a. Make certain that Storage is set to Enable
–10b. Make certain that Store to is set to NAS
–10c. In the NAS remote path box, type // then the IP address recorded in step 7c then /camera — for example: //192.185.1.100/camera
–10d. Make certain that Authorization is set to No
–10e. Make certain that nothing is specified in the User name, Password, or Re-type password boxes
–10f. Leave the Store directory set to the default value of IPCAMERA – the camera will create that folder inside the camera folder that you created in step 1
–10g. Click Apply
11. Verify that the camera is not set up to upload the video to an FTP server:
–11a. Click Task, then Task Management
–11b. Make certain that there is no checkmark next to “Send files in storage to FTP server”
–11c. Click the Apply button

Configuring the Camera’s Motion Detection Settings:
You should expect to receive a number of false alarms with the camera, so it helps to have an easy way to ignore the false alarms (offloading the recorded videos to an FTP server, then viewing extra large icons previews of the videos is how I do it). You can have the camera send an email to you when it senses motion, but that is probably not a good idea. The camera does NOT include physical interface connectors that allow you to connect a PIR unit to the camera to significantly reduce the number of false alarms. The side effect of a PIR unit is that the detection range of the PIR units is typically very short, possibly 30 feet, while the camera can detect motion at much greater distances by analyzing changes in the video image.

Adjusting the multi-zone motion detection areas:
1. Use the Camera Setup program (included with the camera) to find the camera on the network.
2. Double-click the camera in the Camera Setup program to open the camera’s web page.
3. Click the Setting button.
4. At the right of the web page, click Task
5. At the right of the web page, click Motion Detection
6. You will see the camera’s current live video feed, and there will be one large rectangle covering the entire live video feed. If you have used the drawing tools in Microsoft Word or Power Point, or you have experience with resizing windows in Microsoft Windows, you know that moving the mouse pointer to the border of that rectangle will cause the mouse pointer to change. Holding down the left mouse button and moving the mouse left, right, up or down will resize the motion detection rectangle. The titlebar of the motion detection area is also considered part of the motion sensitive area.
7. When finished, click Apply.

There are checkboxes at the right of the camera’s live video feed that allow turning on or off additional motion sensitive rectangles the camera’s video image. Underneath those checkboxes are a “Threshold” and “Sensitivity” slider and a gray bar in between that changes progressively to blue as additional motion is detected. When the blue portion of the bar reaches the position of the “Threshold” slider, the camera will process a motion detection event and do as instructed in the camera’s Task Management settings. The “Sensitivity” slider controls how sensitive the camera is to motion. In general as a starting point, the “Threshold” slider should be in the left 1/4 of the values, and the “Sensitivity” slider should be in the right 1/4 of the values.

Internet Connection Requirements:
The camera does not require an Internet connection to work. However, the software that is provided with the camera requires that an Internet connection is available. Apple’s QuickTime and VideoLAN’s VLC Media Player are able to connect to the camera’s RTSP video feed using a network connection (wireless or wired) to the camera. The Multi-Live software that shipped with the older TriVision and Y-Cam cameras will also work with the camera when there is no Internet connection. Anything that uses the camera’s P2P connection (the AnyScene app, Camera Live) will not work without an Internet connection.

Does this Camera Require a Static IP Address?
Essentially, you just need to plug the camera into your router (to allow entering the wireless connection information into the camera’s setup page) using the supplied network cable to be able to remotely view the camera’s live video feed. As the camera ships from the factory, it is set to use an IP address provided by your router (DHCP is enabled by default), and the camera has the P2P feature enabled by default.

The P2P feature simplifies accessing the camera, allowing you to use either the supplied Camera Live software on a PC, or the free AnyScene app on an Android or Apple iOS device, even if the camera’s IP address periodically changes. The P2P feature uses a unique 20 character alphanumeric code (the UID) that is embedded in the camera and a password that you specify. If the camera is on the same network (your home wireless network, for instance) as the computer with the Camera Live software or the Android/iOS device, the software will automatically locate the cameras, requiring you to just enter the password that is set up on the camera. If the camera is located on a different network (for example, the camera is at your house, and your laptop is at a WIFI hot spot (such as at some McDonalds), you can manually enter the 20 character alphanumeric code (the UID) into the Camera Live software or the AnyScene app, and specify the password for the camera. The Camera Live software (or the AnyScene app) will automatically find the camera using the UID, and allow you to display the live video feed from the camera. Once the camera’s UID is entered, the Camera Live software (or the AnyScene app) will remember the camera’s UID and password. To use the P2P feature, you do not need to make any changes to your router.

The NC-240WF camera supports both DHCP assigned IP addresses (the default) and manually assigned IP addresses. I prefer to use manually assigned IP addresses with my cameras so that the cameras do not occasionally “jump” to a different IP address due to power outages, network issues, router reboots, etc. I prefer to use the Multi-Live software with my cameras, rather than the Camera Live software, because it works with both the NC-240WF cameras that I have as well as my older TriVision cameras. The Multi-Live software, like favorites/bookmarks in a web browser (the camera’s live view is viewable from the camera’s web page), is sensitive to changes in the camera’s IP address. When the camera is set up with a statically assigned IP address, you do not have to obtain static IP addresses from your Internet provider as long as the camera is connected to the “LAN” (private) side of your router, which is the typical default configuration for most home owner type routers.

17 of 19 people found the following review helpful.
4Good camera for inside, not very good for recording thru a window.
By John
I live in Florida. This State has the highest amount of drug dealers and theft in the nation. The police are overwhelmed and underfunded to handle all the calls, so I bought this camera to try to deter the thugs from breaking into my car and apartment. I had to install this unit on the inside behind the window, which makes the night vision worthless, because of the glare, but I have the porch light on, which does help. I have a 32g memory card which is fine for 4 days on low quality setting.

Anyone buying these cameras needs to understand it works off of your internet service provider. I only have 1mbps UPLOAD speed from cox….just one camera can use 1.5mbps UPLOAD speed. The best upload speed from cox is 5mbps at $200 per month…so just realize, if you are using more than one camera, you will have to lower the quality or upgrade your account. I also have the NC-336PW outside camera which is amazing compared to this one. My suggestion is spending the money for the outside camera, which seems to have better video and glare protection.

Ok, so back to what I have found out. I have the camera on motion detection and it recorded over 600 drug deals in one day and over 150 people constantly walking around on the street at night when they should be sleeping. I also recorded 3 people trying to break into my car in just one night. I knew my neighborhood was not the best, but damn, not that bad. The amount of crime has drastically decreased since I have gotten the visible outside camera, but it really shows you how many dishonest people are out there. It’s only going to get worse as the United States Economy continues to collapse. I would suggest that everyone have a camera installed on their apartment, house or even car….unless you live in Saudi Arabia, theft is not a problem, that country cuts off your hands if you steal…

Features of this product

  • Quick Setup and Intuitive Operation—–No Monthly fee ! The HD 1080P WiFi camera is up and running in a matter of minutes on any iPhone, iPad, Android, PC, Mac device
  • Email, Mobile Notification and remote playback——With the HD camera, you always know what is going on, even if you’re behind closed doors or out of town. You can set your camera for instant email alerts and push notifications to your smart device whenever significant motion is detected – and monitor the event in real time while it is automatically recorded onto a microSDHC/XC class 10 memory card. Bringing your safety to the forefront, the camera empowers you to respond instantly to unexpected events and review stored recordings
  • True Day & Night—–The HD 1080p camera features an advanced IR Cut Filter for accurate, vibrant colors and a night vision mode to capture clear, illuminated footage up to 30 feet.
  • With HD 1080P high definition crisp clear image quality, 3 Megapixel lens with 4mm focus length, long range wireless N, true day night vision, built-in Micro SD card dvr, recording internet access,  motion sensor, email alerts and more, the camera is an all-in-one home security camera monitoring system
  • Micro SD card, FTP, NAS, NVR storage—The HD camera provides a local storage solution, recording video directly onto a microSD memory card with up to 128GB capacity (sold seperately). Set your camera for continuous recording or, to minimize viewing time and storage space, for recording only when motion events are detected. The saved video can be remotely viewed from any computer or Android or iOS device. Or record and store to NAS & NVR drives, like Synology, ASUSTOR and QNAP and ONVIF 2.0 compatible for NVR system integration

A lot of crimes are happening in the home. This has increased the need to have a security system in your own home. Parents and homeowners are not always at home. Therefore, important things and people are left at home unprotected and unsafe from people who are to be able to do them harm. As parents are gone for long periods of time everyday, a security DVR is the only thing that can manage this as compared to VCRs that can simply manage small amounts of time.

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